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maintaining-control-of-your-startupWhen you launch your first startup and raise your first round of venture capital you should simply feel lucky. Only 1% of companies seeking venture capital actually receive any funding at all. But by the time you’re raising capital for your second startup you should really start thinking about securing control. Far too many of us have raised venture capital only to be encouraged or forced to make silly decisions by our boards or investors. You don’t have to believe me, take it from my of my current investors, Dave McClure who suggests,

“Most VCs Are Stupid, Insufferable, Arrogant And Terrible At Making Money.”

Once you have one or two or three startups under your belt you’re FAR more experienced than most venture capitalists at running an early stage startup. Don’t let them ruin your company. Find a way to stay in control. If they don’t want you running the company FOREVER they shouldn’t invest and you shouldn’t regret not taking their money.

The very best way to maintain control is to issue the founders Class F shares. These common shares possess some powerful rights. First, they should allow you to keep board control by offering 2 votes for every director appointed by the class. Second, they should magnify your shareholder voting power by 100:1 or 10:1 depending on the number of shares issued. Finally, you should consider adding provisions to your employment agreement that outline the minimum fully diluted share percentage you’re willing to accept – in the event your ownership drops below, say, 15%, the board is required to gross you up. There are a million ways to keep control. The goal is to keep you in control so you can execute on your vision without worrying about getting fired or replaced.

At the end of the day, if your investor accepts the fact that you’re in control for better or worse you know you have a great partner.